The Mobile County Health Department (MCHD) reported Monday on the second case of Vibrio in 2018.  The species has been identified as Vibrio vulnificus.

Image/CDC
Image/CDC

The exposure took place while swimming in either Mobile Bay or Gulf of Mexico waters. Necrotizing fasciitis — an infection that results in the death of the body’s soft tissue — was not present in this case. The case is currently under investigation by MCHD’s Infectious Diseases & Outbreak division.

Vibrio bacteria naturally live in certain coastal waters and are present in higher concentrations between May and October when water temperatures are warmer. However, the bacteria can be present throughout the year in some areas. While Vibrio bacteria can enter the body through a break in the skin, it can also come from consuming contaminated seafood.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that each year in the United States 80,000 individuals become sick with Vibriosis, and 100 people die from their infection. About 52,000 of these illnesses are estimated to be the result of eating contaminated food.

As of August 4, ADPH reports there have been 18 cases of Vibriosis (non-Cholera) reviewed and verified statewide.