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Detroit: Hepatitis A cases investigated at McDonald’s, Greektown Casino

Detroit health officials are investigating two cases of hepatitis A in employees of a McDonald’s and the Greektown Casino.

On Tuesday, health officials announced investigating a Hepatitis A case in connection with a Detroit resident who works as a crew member at McDonald’s in Detroit located at 2889 West Grand Blvd.

Hepatitis A Vaccine
Image/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

They issued the following to patrons:

Those who consumed food and beverages from McDonald’s in Detroit located at 2889 West Grand Blvd from November 8th through November 22nd (exposure period) should consult their primary care provider to receive the Hepatitis A vaccine as early as possible, and before December 6, 2017.

On Thursday, an additional hepatitis A case in an employee at Greektown Casino in Detroit located at 555 East Lafayette. The Detroit Health Department believes the risk of exposure is only in those that were in the private Platinum member card access area of the casino between November 11th and November 22nd.

Those who consumed food and beverages at Greektown Casino (in the private Platinum member card access area) in Detroit from November 11 through November 22 (exposure period) should receive the Hepatitis A vaccine as early as possible, and before December 6, 2017.  The Greektown casino is proactively contacting those individuals to advise them of their vaccination options.

Both facilities are cooperating with the investigation and both have hired third party companies to thoroughly clean and sanitize the establishments. In addition, both facilities are arranging vaccination for employees.

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Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis A virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a severe illness lasting several months. Symptoms can include fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal, and sometimes yellow eyes or skin and dark urine. A person can get Hepatitis A when they eat, drink, or touch their mouth with food, liquid or objects (including their hands) that have come into contact with stool from an infected person. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should seek medical attention immediately.

Southeast Michigan has seen an increase in Hepatitis A cases since 2016 (555 cases/20 deaths). High risk individuals identified in association with this outbreak include persons who: share injection and non-injection street drugs (including pain killers), have sexual activities with someone who has Hepatitis A, have close contact, care for, or live with someone who has Hepatitis A, are homeless or have transient living situations, or are men who have sex with men.

The Detroit Health Department will offer free Hepatitis A vaccines for uninsured Detroit residents who may have consumed food or beverage in the Platinum member card access area during the exposure period at both of its Immunization Clinics Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 8am to 5pm and Wednesday 9am to 6pm.

The clinics are located at:

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