H3N2 canine influenza reported in more than a dozen states - Outbreak News Today | Outbreak News Today Outbreak News Today
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Canine influenza, which hit the Chicago area in recent months and is caused by a H3N2 influenza seen before in Asia, has been confirmed in a possible 13 states, according to multiple sources.

Cornell University Animal Health Diagnostic Center (AHDC) CIV testing map

Cornell University Animal Health Diagnostic Center (AHDC) CIV testing map

According to the Cornell University Animal Health Diagnostic Center (AHDC) as of May 6, positive tests for the virus have come from 11 states: California, Texas, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Alabama, and Michigan.

In fact, The Chicago Veterinary Medical Association reports “severe canine respiratory cases are not diminishing at this time throughout the Chicago metropolitan area, that to date more than 1,700 have been reported to her. In April 2015, two more deaths from CIRDC were reported bringing the number to eight known fatalities.”

However, additional reports from Ohio and Georgia reveal that the virus may have been confirmed in these states also.

Canine influenza (also known as dog flu) is a contagious respiratory disease in dogs caused by specific Type A influenza viruses known to infect dogs. These are called “canine influenza viruses.” Dog flu is a disease of dogs. No human infections with canine influenza have ever been reported. There are two different influenza A dog flu viruses: one is an H3N8 virus and the other is an H3N2 virus.

The H3N2 canine influenza virus is an avian flu virus that adapted to infect dogs. This virus is different from human seasonal H3N2 viruses. Canine influenza A H3N2 virus was first detected in dogs in South Korea in 2007. This virus seems to have been an avian influenza virus that adapted to infect dogs and has since been reported in China and Thailand. H3N2 canine influenza has reportedly infected some cats as well as dogs.

The canine H3N2 virus is genetically different from human seasonal H3N2 viruses. It is not known how canine H3N2 virus was introduced into the United States.

To date, there is no evidence of transmission of canine influenza viruses from dogs to people and there has not been a single reported case of human infection with a canine influenza virus.

 

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