Newborns infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) can be appropriately treated with acyclovir, a drug typically prescribed to adults for the treatment of HSV infections. Acyclovir’s drug label now includes information for healthcare providers on recommended usage and dosage in newborns up to 3 months of age. The data that informed this label change came from a study funded by the National Institutes of Health’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

Image/CDC
Image/CDC

“Until now, doctors did not have complete information about the dosing and use of acyclovir to treat newborns and premature infants, who are vulnerable to serious and potentially life-threatening complications from HSV infection,” said Perdita Taylor-Zapata, M.D., program lead for the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act (BPCA) at NICHD. “With this label change, healthcare providers have clear guidance on how to use and prescribe this drug for their youngest patients.”

HSV causes genital herpes in adults, but newborns can become infected with the virus during pregnancy, labor and delivery or shortly after birth if the mother develops genital herpes near the end of her pregnancy. HSV infection in newborns can cause death or long-term problems such as blindness and damage to the brain and other organs.

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Read more at NIH


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