University of Kentucky: Three students mumps positive - Outbreak News Today | Outbreak News Today Outbreak News Today
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The University Health Service (UHS) with the University of Kentucky (UK) announced three confirmed mumps cases, This follows reports of  a cluster of cases of parotitis (swelling of the salivary glands) within the student population last week.

Image/CDC

Image/CDC

The school says  a cluster of cases of parotitis (swelling of the salivary glands) within our student population. In addition, UK continues to work with the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department as well as the Kentucky Department of Public Health in the ongoing investigation.

Mumps is spread by droplets of saliva or mucus from the mouth, nose, or throat of an infected person, usually when the person coughs, sneezes or talks. Items used by an infected person, such as cups or soft drink cans, can also be contaminated with the virus, which may spread to others if those items are shared.

Symptoms typically appear 16-18 days after infection, but this period can range from 12-25 days after infection. It is usually a mild disease, but can occasionally cause serious complications.

The most common complication is inflammation of the testicles (orchitis) in males who have reached puberty; rarely does this lead to fertility problems.

Other rare complications include inflammation of the brain and/or tissue covering the brain and spinal cord(encephalitis/meningitis), inflammation of the ovaries (oophoritis) and/or breasts (mastitis) infemales who have reached puberty and deafness. Anyone who is not immune from either previous mumps infection or from vaccination can get mumps.

69 mumps cases have been reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as of Feb. 5.

The university noted that the most effective means of mumps prevention is administering two doses of the MMR vaccine.  If you have not previously been vaccinated or if you are unsure if you have received two doses of the MMR vaccine, we are recommending that you get vaccinated.  UHS is currently working to procure additional doses of MMR vaccine for administration to students who are not currently up to date.

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